Heating and Cooling Repair DTC

Posted in Air Conditioning Contractor Denver on January 30, 2018
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You're a homeowner and determined your home's air conditioning needs fixing or needs to be replaced with a newer, more efficient system. You're all set to get moving. What's the optimal way to get a high quality HVAC contractor who will do a good job for a fair price? What could you look for in an air conditioning contractor to obtain this work? DTC 

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When homeowners choose to repair an air conditioning system or replace the unit with a newer one, they're often plagued by worries that their family will swelter while the job is completed.  These concerns are perfectly normal and common among many homeowners looking for HVAC fixes or air conditioner repair specialists.

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Heating Installation Services If you feel that your oil furnace is not operating properly, it is important to identify the symptoms so the repair can be addressed in a timely manner. A problem occurring right in the middle of the coldest part of winter needs to be addressed quickly, and troubleshooting the issue will go a long way in getting the system back online. Here are some of the more common oil furnace repair symptoms that you might be experiencing.Oil Burner Working But Not FiringOne of the most common causes of this issue is the oil tank is empty. During extreme winters like this region has experienced in recent years, the furnace may be running much more than in recent years. Your fuel delivery may be scheduled regularly, but due to more heat needed, the tank ran dry. The lines could have picked up sediment from the bottom of the tank and now the nozzles are clogged too. Other possible causes could be a cracked igniter or the oil pump has stopped working. Have the tank filled with fuel and see if that addresses the issue. If not, schedule a service call immediately. The Oil Furnace Burner Not WorkingPossible causes for the burner not operating are loss of power and no fuel. If a fuse has blown, the burner will not operate properly as well. Make certain that the setting on the thermostat is appropriate, then check to see if any fuses are in fact blown. Be certain there is plenty of fuel in the tank. Also check to see if any wires leading up to the circuit box might be frayed or broken. Turn the thermostat higher than normal, see if the system turns on. It might be as simple as a blocked filter or possibly the blower motor is inoperable.Smoke From the BurnerA clogged nozzle is usually the culprit when it comes to smoke coming from the burner. This might be a quick fix, simply adjusting the nozzle could do the trick. If the issue is not in the nozzle, there may be a blockage in the chimney causing a decrease in air flow that could be the trouble. The possible cure for this type of oil burner issue is usually a nozzle adjustment or replacement. A combustion analysis will be able to reveal where the underlying cause of trouble actually lies.Burning Too Much FuelIf you notice that your oil furnace is going through too much fuel, there could be some adjustments that are needed. The first area to check is the condition of the furnace and when the last time it was cleaned. The home insulation plays a huge role in how the furnace controls the temperature in the house. Drafty doors and windows are huge energy wasters, literally sucking the heat from your home faster than it is produced. Consider having the home inspected to see if those drafts are more severe than you realize. One other place to look is the duct work. The system needs to be sealed properly or air is escaping and not getting to the rooms that need heat most. Fumes in the HouseYou should never be able to smell the furnace burning inside your home. Smoke issues inside the house can be caused by a clogged nozzle, cracked heater exchange, and improper end cone on the furnace. This can be a very dangerous situation, and if replacing the nozzle does not fix the fumes issue, you may have to have the chimney professionally cleaned.

HVAC - Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning

Boiler Furnace Repair To fix household things that break, you need to know how it works, what can go wrong, how to identify the problem, as well as the steps to fixing it. Here's what you need to know about gas furnace repairs.How Does It Work?Natural or propane gas from an outside source is piped to the furnace where it is burned to produce heat. Usually a fan-driven forced-air distribution system blows the warmed air through ducts that vent into the various rooms of the house. Older gas furnaces use a standing-pilot ignition. Maintenance involves turning off the pilot each spring and relighting it each fall. Newer, more efficient gas furnaces use an electric spark to light the gas as necessary.What Can Go Wrong?Most gas furnaces are quite reliable. What are the symptoms of problems? The furnace may not produce heat or may not produce enough heat. The pilot light may go out repeatedly or refuse to light. The thermocouple may be faulty. The pilot may light but not ignite the burner. The furnace may be noisy. There are some maintenance and a few minor repairs that you can make. However, major service should be left to a trained technician.Fix-It TipTo minimize problems with your gas furnace, take time each month to check the air filter and clean or replace it if necessary. Once a year, clean the blower blades, lubricate the blower motor, and inspect the belt.How Can I Identify the Problem? If there is no heat, check the electrical service panel for a burned fuse or tripped breaker. Relight the pilot light (see below).If there is not enough heat, adjust the burner air shutter (see below); and clean the burner ports (see below).If the pilot light does not light or does not stay lit, clean the pilot orifice carefully with a toothpick, test the thermocouple and replace it if it is faulty (see below).If the flame flickers, adjust the pilot (see below).If there is an exploding sound when the burner ignites, adjust the pilot to a higher setting and clean the pilot orifice and the burner ports.If the burner takes more than a few seconds to ignite, clean the pilot orifice and adjust the pilot light.If the burner flame is uneven, clean the burner ports. If the burner flame is very yellow, clean the burner; open vents in the furnace room to provide more air; adjust the burner air shutter.If the furnace makes a rumbling noise when the burners are off, clean the burner and adjust the burner air shutter.If the air is too dry, wash or replace the evaporator pad if you have a humidifier; test the humidistat; and adjust the water-level float to raise the water level.If some rooms are too cool and others too warm, the distribution system may require balancing. Refer to the Forced-Air Distribution Fix-It Guide at FixItClub.comFix-It TipBe sure your filter is the right size for your furnace.What Parts, Materials, and Tools Do I Need?Some replacement parts for gas furnaces are interchangeable (filters, fasteners) and available at your local hardware store. Others, such as burners and controls, must be purchased from the manufacturer or aftermarket supplier or through a heating equipment supplier listed in your local telephone book.The primary tools you will need for fixing a gas furnace include these:* Screwdrivers* Wrenches* Pliers* Wire brush* MultimeterWhat Are the Steps to Fixing It?To light the pilot on a standing-pilot (always on) ignition system, follow the lighting instructions located near the control. Otherwise, try these steps:Light the pilot:1. Press and hold the pilot control knob to start the pilot. Set the control knob to the pilot position. Hold a long match under the pilot gas port.2. Press the control knob; the pilot should light. Hold the control knob down until the flame is burning brightly (about 30 seconds). Release pressure on the knob, and turn it to the on position.3. If the pilot goes out when you release the control knob, try relighting, holding the control knob down longer. If the pilot again goes out, check the thermocouple (below).Adjust the pilot:1. Remove any cap covering the pilot adjusting screw on a combination control. 2. Turn the adjusting screw counterclockwise to increase the flame or clockwise to decrease it. It is correctly adjusted when the flame envelops the thermocouple bulb by 1/2 inch and appears dark blue with a small yellow tip.Test and replace a thermocouple:1. Hold the control knob to pilot and light the pilot as above.2. Unscrew the thermocouple fitting with an open-ended wrench.3. Set a multimeter to the DVC (lowest voltage) scale.4. Clip one multimeter lead to the end of the thermocouple tube nearest the pilot and the other lead to the fitting on the other end of the tube.5. If the multimeter shows a reading besides zero, the thermocouple is functioning. Replace the thermocouple tube.6. If there is no reading, you will need to clean or replace the thermocouple following steps 7 through 11.7. Release the control knob and shut off the main gas valve on the gas-supply pipe that leads into the burner. Shut off power to the burner at the electrical service panel .8. Remove the thermocouple from its mounting bracket.9. Wipe the combination control clean and install a new thermocouple, tightening it by hand, then give it a one-quarter turn with a wrench.10. Insert the thermocouple into the pilot bracket, being careful to not crimp the tubing.11. Turn on power to the furnace and relight the pilot (above). Home Heating Company

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